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You asked us.

Every day we get asked for more information about our Association and the industry of business coaching. While entire books have been dedicated to some of the topics in question, most people just want the short answer.

With this in mind, we've compiled direct responses or executive briefs to the most common questions we receive. We've divided this information into several sections, for easy reference:

About the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches

Q: Who is WABC? How is it unique? How is it different from other associations?
A: The Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) has been leading the way since 1997:

  • We are the first international association to represent the business coaching industry;
  • We are dedicated solely to the business coaching industry;
  • We have set the highest international standards for business coaches in the world today:
    - advanced admission and renewal standards for membership;
    - membership is inclusive (having a WABC credential is not necessary) and based on business experience, coaching experience, and references;
    - members must provide proof of their educational degrees and professional designations should they choose to show their name and credentials with any Association service marks;
    - members are also guided by a business coaching code of ethics and integrity.

These standards have resulted in attracting some of the most influential business, corporate and executive coaches in the world.
Related Info:
Is the business coaching industry regulated?
Regulation, Standards & Research

 
Q: How will WABC help me?
A: WABC membership offers you seven strategic benefits: credibility, recognition, advocacy, networking, business development, personalized service and strategic alliances. You’ll have access to professional development through our commitment to be your knowledge center for long-term continued growth. In the short-term, we understand your time constraints, so we’ll help you stay current by providing the latest business trends and coaching news in an executive summary format for quick reading and response.
Related Info:
WABC Advantage

 
Q: Do you have to have a coaching designation to become a member of WABC?
A: No. As an emerging profession worldwide, many business coaches have been coaching for years and have not yet sought out professional designations. Although a professional designation is an acknowledgement of your commitment to the industry, it's not required to practice as a business coach nor to be a member of WABC at this time. Instead, WABC's rigorous membership requirements are inclusive and based on business experience, coaching experience, and references.
Related Info:
Regulation, Standards & Research

 
Q: Are WABC designations and training programs accredited by anyone?
A: Business coaching is a self-regulated industry and emerging profession. As such, WABC is among a small number of established professional associations that operate independently in the interests of the business coaching industry. WABC is undertaking various initiatives to set the international standard for business coaching.
Related Info:
Who is WABC?
Regulation, Standards & Research

 
Q: If I leave my organization, does my WABC membership "travel" with me?
A: Currently, all membership levels in WABC are individual. Your WABC membership is fully portable should you change employment and continue to meet WABC’s eligibility requirements. 


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About the business coaching industry

Q: Is the business coaching industry regulated? 
A: Business coaching is a self-regulated industry. As such, a small number of established professional associations operate independently in the interests of the business coaching industry.
Related Info:
Regulation


Q: How big is the business coaching industry?
A: Many estimates
abound and WABC is undertaking various international research projects over the following years to gather more reliable information. 
Related Info:
Subscribe today to receive research updates.


Q: Are there other business coaching associations?

A: Yes. Please visit Peer Resources--a WABC exclusive strategic ally--for a comprehensive listing of other related associations from around the world.


Q: How do I choose the right business coaching association for me?
A: Not all associations are created alike. Here are some these key questions to ask yourself before joining any association:

  • What kind of coaching services do I primarily provide? (Business or personal?)
  • What do I want from a professional association? (Where will I find value? What kind of benefits am I looking for?)
  • Am I in strong alignment with the association's core philosophies? Its governance structure?
  • Do I want to get involved? (What kind of leadership and/or volunteer opportunities are available?)
  • Am I an active engager, or passive onlooker? (Read: You get what you put into it.)
  • What kind of ROI do I need to realize by the end of each membership term? (Am I willing to make a longer-term commitment in my association or associations of choice? Associations continue to grow, develop and evolve through the constant commitment of both their leaders and their members.)

Peer Resources offers an unbiased, independent overview of what to look for in a "professional" association, as well as a listing of associations, organizations and networks. 

About business coaching training and credentialing

Q: Do I have to take formal training to practice as a business coach?
A: No. Many business coaches have been coaching for years and have not taken formal training.


Q: Do you recommend I take formal business coaching training?
A: Yes. Business coaching is a distinct type of interaction requiring specific competencies and skills. Regardless of your professional background, quality business coaching training ensures you are understanding and practicing "business coaching." 


Q: How do I choose the right business coaching training program for me?
A: Worldwide, there are hundreds of business coaching training programs on the market today. From basic business coaching 101 to fully accredited PhD programs, there is certainly much to choose from. So, just how do you find the right program? These questions will help guide you towards making the right choice:

Basic questions:

  • What is my level of familiarity, skill and ability with business coaching now?
  • Do I already have significant life and business experience?
  • Do I already have significant experience working in one-on-one client relationships?
  • Do I already have significant experience facilitating team interactions?
  • What core content am I looking for? (Basic or advanced business coaching skills and practice? Business coaching model and methodology? International business content? Cross-cultural issues? Ethics in business and business coaching?)
  • Does the faculty or instructors have the appropriate experience, background and credentials to be teaching this program?
  • Is this a new business coaching program or an established one? (If established, ask for graduate references so you can check out the program further.)
  • Is this program accredited? If yes, is it accredited by appropriate and reputable accrediting bodies?
  • Do I also want to earn a business coaching credential? (A designation? A degree? Both? Regarding designations, not all training programs lead to the awarding of an actual designation. A "certificate of achievement" is not the same as earning a "registered" or "certified" designation.)
  • If I do want to earn a business coaching credential, do I also want it to be recognized by a professional business coaching association?
  • Did I review the program's fine print? (Do I understand all their terms, policies, etc.?)
  • Do I want a live, teleclass or a mixed learning format?
  • Does location of training matter?
  • What is my budget?
  • What is my timeframe?

For external coaches (emerging and new)--
Additional question to ask:

  • Have I prepared a business plan? If not, create one before taking a program--it will help you make the "right" training decision because you will have the necessary focus and know what kind of skills you need to learn and develop. Among many key questions to address are:
    - am I starting my own practice? Do I want to join a firm of business coaches? Buy a franchise?
    - what kind of coaching service am I providing?
    - how will my service be unique?
    - who is my ideal client?
    - what kind of coaching interventions do I want to provide? (i.e. Providing assessments and debriefing? Shadow coaching? Succession coaching?) 
    - what kind of coaching does this client typically prefer? (Live or virtual (telephone, video conferencing, email), mix? Keep in mind, not all clients want to do virtual, in particular, telephone coaching, regardless of what some training programs try to promote. Additionally, not all types of business coaching interventions are suitable for virtual interactions.)
    - do I want to travel as part of my coaching work? (Less? More?)
    - will I be practicing on a local, regional, national or international level?

For external coaches (experienced)--
Additional question to ask:

  • Is my current practice where I want it to be? (If not, what needs to change?)
  • If I'm changing my focus, what is it?
  • Who is my target client?
  • What kind of coaching interventions do I want to provide? (i.e. Providing assessments  and debriefing? Shadow coaching? Succession coaching?) 
  • What kind of coaching does this client typically prefer? (Live or virtual (telephone, video conferencing, email), mix?)
  • Do I want to travel as part of my coaching work? (Less? More?)
  • Will I be continuing to practice on a local, regional, national or international level?
  • What is the purpose of training for me at this point? (To advance my skills? To change my practice focus?)

For internal coaches (emerging and new)--
Additional question to ask:

  • What kind of coaching services will I be providing to my business/organization?
  • Will coaching be my primary role, or will I also be fulfilling other roles and responsibilities?
  • Who will I be coaching? Reporting to?
  • Is coaching integrated into our business/organization's overall HR strategy? If yes, is both external and internal coaching being implemented? If yes, do I have experience working on a team of external and internal coaches?
  • Will I be providing internal coaching services for a significant period of time? Or, is this position short-term or temporary?

For internal coaches (experienced)--
Additional question to ask:

  • What kind of coaching services will I be providing to my business/organization?
  • Will coaching be my primary role, or will I also be fulfilling other roles and responsibilities?
  • Who will I be coaching? Reporting to?
  • Is coaching integrated into our business/organization's overall HR strategy? If yes, is both external and internal coaching being implemented? If yes, do I have experience working on a team of external and internal coaches?
  • Will I be providing internal coaching services for a significant period of time? Or, is this position short-term or temporary?
  • If you've been in this role for some time already, are you satisfied with your role? (What needs to change?)
  • What is the purpose of training for me at this point? (To advance my skills?) 

WABC Accredited Programs
WABC Events, Education & Training
Peer Resources provides a comprehensive listing of coach training programs.


Q: Do I have to earn a coaching credential to practice as a business coach?

A: No. Although a professional business coaching designation is an acknowledgement of your commitment to the industry, it's not required to practice as a business coach at this time.
 

Q: How do I choose the right business coaching credentialing program for me?
A: As a self-regulated industry, any association, training school or organization can decide independently if they want to engage in the business of certifying (for individuals) and/or accrediting (for training schools/organizations). To find the right program for you, consider and seek to find out:

  • What kind of coaching services do I primarily provide--business or personal?
  • How credible is the sponsoring entity--association, school or organization?
  • What educational level is the credential set at?
  • Does the credentialing program require I obtain training? Or, is it set on an equivalency model?
  • Does the credentialing program follow these best practices standards?:
    - it was developed with broad stakeholder involvement;
    - it is legally defensible;
    - the evaluation processes are psychometrically sound;
    the evaluation processes are transparent and independent of the sponsoring entity;
    - the evaluation and administrative processes are responsive and timely;
    - the evaluators have the appropriate experience, background and credentials to be assessing candidates;
    - there are detailed grievance/appeal procedures;
    - there are renewal/maintenance requirements; and

    - the sponsoring entity itself is accredited by appropriate accrediting bodies? If not, it is seeking such accreditation.
  • Who awards the business coaching credential?

WABC Accredited Programs
WABC Events, Education & Training
Peer Resources provides a comprehensive listing of coach training programs, many of which lead to credentials.


About business coaching


Why use a business coach?
Enhanced business results.
We think businesses need three essential services to thrive: strategic, legal and financial. Business coaching is the strategic prong.

Business leaders seeking business coaching are looking for more than life change. They're looking for a means to achieve both personal and professional objectives that are tied to their top and bottom lines.


How did business coaching get started?

We believe there are three broad categories of coaching in the marketplace today: sports, personal and business. Business coaching is used as an umbrella term to include all types of business and organizationally related coaching. Thus, business coaching includes both internal and external coaches who work as business coaches, corporate coaches, executive coaches, leadership coaches, organizational development coaches and many other types of coaches.

The first research papers on business coaching can be traced to improvement in performance of sales teams in the 1930s. Business coaching is a hybrid profession informed by related disciplines including coaching, psychology, organizational development, management science and consulting, human resource management, ethics, applied theology, adult learning and training and development.

Thus, business coaching, like other emerging professions (e.g. project management) and other established professions (e.g., architecture) is essentially a hybrid profession incorporating elements from many different disciplines. The interdisciplinary nature of business coaching makes it more challenging to define its body of knowledge.


Who uses business coaches?
Business leaders, owners, CEOs, entrepreneurs, directors, managers and emerging leaders. Anyone who has a business-related personal/professional objective and is ready to take action.


What’s the difference between a business coach and a life skills coach, a mentor, a consultant or a therapist?
A business coach engages in meaningful communication with individuals in businesses, organizations, institutions or governments, with the goal of promoting success at all levels of the organization by affecting the actions of those individuals. 
Related Info:
WABC Business Coaching Definition

A life skills coach (also referred to as a personal coach) collaborates with his or her coachee in a highly interactive working partnership for the purpose of assisting the coachee on clarifying what he/she really wants from life.

Life coaches are seen as strategic partners and facilitate enhanced life satisfaction.

Together the life skills coach and coachee work on setting more effective personal goals and new strategic actions, and on staying focused and accountable so that the coachee may lead a more successful and satisfying life. The coach and coachee co-design a direction and the coachee commits to taking action to succeed. Accountability in coaching is shared between the coach and the coachee.

A mentor is usually an older and/or more experienced person who provides advice, guidance and support to a younger and/or less experienced person for the purpose of personal, professional, spiritual or life growth. In business settings, those groomed for advancement are often formally or informally mentored by senior executives.

Mentors are seen as experts and show protégés’ "the ropes."

A consultant provides advice or expert knowledge to a client in a particular field or discipline. It's predominantly one-way communication, with accountability on the consultant for delivering on the outcome. The client is expected to implement the consultant's recommendations.

Business consultants are seen as experts and advise on business issues.

A counselor or therapist focuses on psychosocial issues and/or psychological disorders with an emphasis on the diagnosis and analysis of the client/patient. The focus is exclusively on the client/patient and there’s a low possibility that the counselor or therapist will request feedback.

Counselors or therapists are typically seen as experts and try to heal psychosocial dysfunctionality.


What kind of benefits could I expect from working with a business coach?
Your business coach acts as a confidential strategic business partner who assists you to leverage your personal and operational success. Among the broad array of service offerings, your coach may assist you to:

  • Rejuvenate business growth
  • Build interpersonal competencies
  • Enhance organizational capabilities
  • Develop skills and knowledge base
  • Prioritize goals and develop strategies to achieve objectives within set timeframes
  • Deal with conflict
  • Streamline business processes and systems
  • Improve morale
  • Direct and support organizational change
  • Collaborate to create and execute personal/business development plans
  • Deliver feedback
  • Conduct needs analyses
  • Develop and interpret performance assessments


How does business coaching work?
Business coaching relationships are custom designed to match individual goals and objectives. A typical set of stages could look like this for an external business coaching program***:

Step 1: Contracting or Intake Stage.
Meetings typically occur between the client*, coachee** and the coach to discuss business coaching services and to define the strategic business context. These one or two contracting open dialogues set the stage for a solid business coaching process. Successful business coaching relationships require trust, safety, honesty, support, challenge and high-quality feedback.

Once all key parties (client, coachee, coach) are ready to move forward, these contracting objectives including clearly defined processes, roles, responsibilities and expectations are typically formalized into several documents including a Business Coaching Agreement and Confidentiality Agreement.

Step 2: Information Gathering and Debriefing Stage.
Appropriate business and organizational information is first gathered and reviewed by the coach. Typical information includes personnel file, organizational values and principles, mission and vision, ethical statements, organizational charts (formal and informal), annual reports, policies and procedures, internal correspondence, operating plans, product literature, analyst’s reports, and public files.

Your business and/or organization is a complex system. Thus, business coaches can use a variety of information gathering tools and assessments to assist them:

  1. In-Depth Structured Interviews
    These are custom designed interviews with key stakeholders to specifically target the coachee's business issues.
  2. Direct Observation (Shadow & Observational Coaching)
    This is one of our most powerful information gathering tools. Business coaches are trained competent observers. The business coach may recommend observing the coachee in certain business contexts in order to assess how he or she interacts with others and manages his or her working environment. Remember, business coaching is about facilitating behavioral shifts that result in enhanced performance. Seeing the coachee in action allows the business coach to better understand the coachee and how he or she impacts others.
  3. Other Standardized and Non-Standardized Assessment Tools
    The business coach and coachee will discuss what type of additional assessments are appropriate given your particular goals and objectives. This phase can take anywhere from one to several days or even weeks depending upon the types of assessments used.

In general terms, expect that information gathering tools and assessments will almost certainly include the coachee's interpersonal, communication and leadership styles; emotional and attitude management; and physical comportment.
 
Step 3: Feedback Stage.
Following each key information gathering stage or assessment, the coachee will receive verbal, written and/or audio feedback. A discussion will establish the purpose of each information gathering stage and/or assessment, and when and how feedback is to be delivered.

Step 4: Planning and Active Coaching Stage.
Equipped with powerful baseline data from these information gathering stages and assessments, the business coach and coachee can now diagnose intelligently what needs to be done next—at least in broadest terms—to work towards the establishment of significant goals and an action-results development plan.

Step 5: Reassessment Coaching Stage.
A reassessment phase every agreed upon number of months consists of an abridged version of the initial assessment and allows the business coach to evaluate, refine and enhance the coaching program. The results of this reassessment are shared with identified organizational change partners to help fortify the coachee's change initiatives and ensure business or organizational alignment.

Step 6: Final Evaluation Coaching Stage.
Towards the end of the business coaching program, the business coach and the coachee identify suitable evaluation processes (such as‚ shadow coaching, interviews with key stakeholders) to provide a final measure of the extent to which the goals have been met and what impact the accomplishment of these goals has had on the coachee and the business or organization. An evaluation of the business coach and the program is also conducted.

Formalized feedback is provided to the executive leadership only if this is applicable and was agreed upon during the contracting phase of the business coaching program.

Step 7: Follow-on Coaching Stage.
In the final session, the business coach and coachee discuss next steps. Follow-on business coaching is often suitable to further support and reinforce the learning and new behaviors that have been established.

Alternatively, the business coach may work with the coachee to create a game plan that the coachee implements on his or her own with the assistance of other business or organizational partners to help ensure permanent positive behavioral change and sustained success.


If my boss or HR department is hiring a business coach for me, are my sessions confidential?
The business coaching relationship is confidential but not privileged. Privileged relationships exist only between attorneys and their clients. The specific nature of the confidentiality agreement and the duty of confidentiality for the business coaching relationship is embodied in the coaching contract which the coachee agrees to and signs before the coaching relationship begins.


If my boss or HR department is hiring a business coach for me, are there any written reports submitted about my sessions?

The specific nature of the business coaching program is embodied in the business coaching contract which the coachee agrees to and signs before the business coaching relationship begins. If written reports were required, this contract would outline the nature of those reports. Any reports submitted by the business coach would be viewed by the coachee prior to submission.


What happens in a typical session?
The business coach and coachee typically engage in a continuous progression of conversations, observations and practice.

Conversations evolve around the business coach exploring the coachee's current issues, and challenging the coachee's entrenched thinking patterns and assumptions which serve to maintain the status quo and interrupt or block the coachee's new goals and objectives.

Observations include noting inconsistencies between the coachee's stated goals and objectives and his or her counterproductive actions. High-performance feedback facilitates the coachee coming to greater awarenesses about his or her operational style. This feedback is also two-way, as the business coach also needs to receive feedback on a regular basis so that the coaching relationship is consistently serving the coachee's objectives.

Practice includes any variety of action-oriented business coach interventions or coachee activities or assignments designed to assist the coachee in achieving enhanced business performance. These may include coach-coachee role plays, in-between sessions assignments (reading, researching, journaling, self-care initiatives, etc.), the coachee attempting to deal with a conflicted work relationship, etc.

A typical session may or may not include all these phases depending upon the stage in the business coaching program and current issues.

 
What are typical session lengths?
The appropriate session length is determined by the nature of the coachee's goals and objectives, time pressures on the part of the coachee, and budget considerations. Typically, sessions are 30 - 90 minutes in length. Shadow or observational coaching may last for several hours depending upon the nature of the behaviors and activities being observed.


How are sessions conducted?
Sessions may be conducted in person, virtually (by phone, email, etc.) or a combination of several methods. If conducted in person, approaches include:

  • Business coach observes coachee (Shadow or Observational Coaching)
  • Business coach works only with coachee (One-on-One)
  • Business coach works with coachee and his or her team (Team Coaching)
  • Business coach works only with coachee as he or she interacts with his or her team (Leader/Manager Coaching)
  • Business coach works only with coachee as he or she interacts with another individual (Leader/Manager in a One-on-One)

How sessions are conducted are determined by the nature of the coachee's goals and objectives, preferences on the part of the business coach and the coachee, and budget considerations.


Are there activities for me to perform in between sessions?
This depends upon the nature of the coachee's goals and objectives. Expect some assignments to assist you in learning and growing.


How many sessions are in a coaching program?
This depends upon the frequency and duration of the program, as well as the nature of the coachee's personal, professional and/or organizational goals and objectives.


What is the frequency of sessions?
The appropriate frequency of sessions is determined by the nature of the coachee's goals and objectives, time pressures on the part of the coachee, and budget considerations. Typically, business coaches and coachees meet weekly, bi-weekly or monthly.


What is the duration of a program?
Most business coaching programs are four to twelve months, with some programs going more than twelve months, or continuing on an ongoing basis. The duration depends upon the nature of the coachee's personal, professional and/or organizational goals and objectives.


How much does business coaching cost?
As a strategic business partner, a business coach charges a rate range similar to other essential business service providers (attorneys and accountants).


How do I find a "credible" business coach?
Like most emerging professions, business coaching has become popularized by a myriad of "niche" practitioners. There are a number of ways to find business coaches:

1.   Explore what the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) can offer.
WABC is the first professional coaching association dedicated exclusively to business coaching. Membership is selective and based upon eligibility requirements:    
2. WABC events.
More details.
3. Ask other business service providers for recommendations.
Your business consultant, attorney, accountant, financial planner, banker, corporate trainer, HR advisor or other business provider may know of a business coach that he or she can recommend.
4. Check with these other coaching organizations, associations and networks.
More details.

How do I select a business coach?
WABC recommends that you carefully interview several business coaches to find the right match for you. Finding the right business coach is as critical as selecting the right attorney and financial advisor.

Some Suggested Interview Questions:

  1. What is your background in business?
  2. What is your background in coaching?
  3. Why did you decide to become a business coach? 
  4. What credentials do you have in coaching or other related fields?
  5. What is your general philosophy of and approach to business coaching?
  6. What is your personal coaching style?
  7. How do you continue to develop yourself as a coach?
  8. Do you have now, or have you worked with, your own business or other type of coach?
  9. What kind(s) of clients you do work best with?
  10. What kind(s) of business issues do you work best with?
  11. How are you different from or similar to other coaches?
  12. My personal/business issue or challenge involves __; how have you assisted others with this kind of issue or challenge? (TIP: Listen to ensure that your prospective Business Coach isn't simply prescribing remedies. See Quick Reviews & Additional Tips below.)
  13. How will I know if I'm ready for business coaching?
  14. How do you give feedback? Could you provide me with some feedback about what you've heard and observed about me so far?
  15. How do you conduct your coaching sessions? In-person, telephone, email, combination, etc.
  16. How do we determine the appropriate frequency and duration of sessions; length of coaching program?
  17. What are your rates?
  18. What are the terms of your contract for coaching services?
  19. Do you belong to any professional coaching associations?
  20. Do these associations have a code of ethics? 
  21. What else do I need to know to make an informed decision? 
  22. Could you work with me? How did you determine this?
     
    And always ask for current references that you can contact. WABC Full Members were required to provide five client references to qualify for Full Membership status.

Quick Review & Additional Tips:

  1. Interview several prospective business coaches.
    Business coaching relationships are built on trust, safety, honesty, support, challenge and high-quality feedback. After your interview, reflect upon how you feel and think about the prospective business coach:
    - Do you think you can trust this prospective business coach?
    - Why, why not?
    - Could you let your guard down and become vulnerable enough to really learn and open yourself up to new ways of thinking and acting with this prospective business coach?
    - Why, why not? 
  2. Look for the right "fit." It makes no difference if the business coach works with a large coaching firm, or is a solo practitioner. As long as the prospective business coach can meet your coaching needs and at a price you can afford, you're set.
  3. Understand the differences between a business coach and other types of intervenors. (Review question #3 in the main "Why Use a Business Coach" section.) If your prospective business coach or your current business coach isn't focused on assisting you to build your own capacities and resources to respond more consciously, skillfully and appropriately to your leadership and management challenges, and instead is focused almost exclusively on advice giving, then chances are you aren't receiving business coaching. If this is the case, talk with your business coach about your observations.
  4. Ask for at least five recent client/coachee references that you can contact. It's important to know if your prospective business coach has satisfied clients/coachees. 

* The party sponsoring the coaching process. Could also be the party receiving the coaching.
**The party receiving the coaching.
*** Internal coaching processes may vary to some degree from those stages described above.

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About the WABC logo

What is the symbolism and meaning behind our exciting logo?
Our logo was designed to connect themes of ‘global,’ ‘inspiration’ and ‘business.’ Blue arches symbolize continents linking together in a united advantage. The copper arch represents cutting edge leadership, which is propelling—or emerging—forward. The black background illustrates a solid foundation; it symbolizes structure, support, and professionalism.

Of particular interest is the sense of motion in a world with limitless boundaries, where stand-out leaders reach out of the box .... 

 Global - continents, linking, together, uniting, advantage

Inspiration - cutting edge, propel, performance, leadership, emerging

 Business - foundation, solid, structure, professionals, support

 Global, Inspiration, Business

 
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