28Jul/140

Reinventing Your Coaching Practice: Part III

Posted by WABC

By Todd Uterstaedt 

In parts I and II of “Reinventing Your Coaching Practice” I outlined the immense opportunity you have to have a greater impact and increased revenue by developing an online platform for your coaching business.  I received a few messages from some of you that said you were inspired to take action and a few messages that said you were not sure where to start. I hope this blog can help.

Partnership is a term that coaches understand. As I’m sure you know, coaches help their clients get remarkable results ONLY in partnership with them. I think the same can be said of reinventing your coaching practice. A great partnership with people who understand the world of online marketing is vital to the transformation of your business.

We faced the same question when we launched www.daughtersincharge.com. We were not sure how to position our new global niche of daughters working in their family business. We knew practically nothing about online marketing. Product launches, merchant accounts, WordPress widgets, bounce rates, newsjacking, etc. were all foreign to us. Along the way, we learned some things about finding the right partner to help with our own knowledge and skill gaps in these areas. I would like to share three key insights that I hope will help you find just the right partner.

1 - Generic Marketers versus Online "Expert" Marketers: As a coach with a global niche who has done your homework to “own” your 3-4 niche keywords, you need a partner who understands the unique art of crafting an “expert online persona” and growing an audience of potential clients. Our company is based in Cincinnati, OH, home of long time marketing demigods of Procter & Gamble, Macy’s and Kroger. There are MANY marketing companies here supporting these companies. But, most of them specialize in the marketing of consumer packaged goods, not "thought leaders” creating unique content that serves a very specific global niche.

2 - Start Small, Dream Big: There are many pathways to transforming your coaching practice into a global entity. Invariably you will encounter partners who want to sell you on THE process/approach/method that has worked for “hundreds of clients.” Be wary. There is NO one template to building this new type of coaching practice. And, the methods, tools, and software change weekly. Choose a partner who will encourage the right approach that works for you and your audience. Ask if you can start small and build from there. One company we interviewed wanted us to adopt a “be everywhere” approach that embraced blogging, weekly podcasting, weekly video tutorials, constant tweeting, and almost all social media platforms. It was overwhelming and unnecessary for our global audience niche. We needed a partner that would allow us to start small, learn as we go, and grow as we learn.

3 - Be Your Authentic Self: As coaches we advocate this for our clients, right? Should this be any different with us and our public digital persona? Stay away from partners who want to create your personal brand in a manner that makes you uncomfortable. Are you a formal person who wants a professional photo versus an image of you frolicking on a Caribbean beach? Is there a mismatch between your “voice” and the “voice" portrayed in the website copy a partner wants you to use? The key to creating a global niche is to present the “you that is you”.

Of course, there are other partners that can support your journey. They can include virtual assistants, accountants, professional writers, editors, legal experts and of course, business coaches who truly understand this new global online niche coaching world. There are many resources to find great people like this. Check out www.elance.com and www.odesk.com  as a start. We found our marketing partner, www.solamaragency.com, after we had a positive experience with a coach whose online program was very well put together. We found out who she used and contacted them for an initial interview.

My advice? Just take one small action today to move yourself that much closer to transforming your coaching practice. If you get stuck, find a partner. Or, email me. I would be happy to help. Good luck.

UterstaedtTodd Uterstaedt is President & CEO of Baker & Daboll, LLC, the leading Executive Coaching firm in Cincinnati, OH. He is also co-founder of “Daughters in Charge”, an online community for daughters working in their family’s business.
If you wish to reproduce this article in any material form, you must first contact WABC for permission.
16Jul/140

Leadership Is A Contact Sport: Think

Posted by Marshall Goldsmith

In this week's video blog by Marshall Goldsmith, he describes the essence of pausing to think before we speak as leaders.

 

Marshall Goldsmith is a proud member of and partner with the WABC.  In both 2011 and 2013 he was ranked as one of the Top Ten Business Thinkers in the World – and the highest ranking executive coach – at the biennial Thinkers 50 ceremony in London.  He was also the recognized in 2011 as the World’s Most Influential Leadership Thinker.  Dr. Goldsmith is the author or editor of 34 books, including the New York Times bestsellers, MOJO and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There.
If you wish to reproduce this article in any material form, you must first contact WABC for permission.
14Jul/140

Leave Your Campsite Better Than You Found It

Posted by WABC

Be prepared!  This April, the Boy Scout motto came to life.    Some Boy Scouts were hiking in Harriman State Park.  They came across journalist Ann Curry, in pain and hobbled.  She said she thought her ankle was broken.

The scouts collected items to make a splint.  But even with the splint, Ms. Curry could not negotiate the terrain.  Again, the scouts were prepared.   They made a stretcher with 2 poles and tarp and then tested it on a scout before placing Ms. Curry on the stretcher.  The scouts then carried her down the steep terrain with a guide in front to avoid any trail pitfalls.

Thirty minutes later, Ms. Curry was reunited with her husband and son who had gone for help.  Safely in the family car, she was taken to a hospital for treatment.

Many lessons can be learned here.  The scouts didn’t have a splint, but knew how to fashion a splint.  The scouts didn’t have a stretcher.  Again, they knew how to create one.  The scouts didn’t leave hiking down the mountain to chance.  They assessed the smoothest path.

Succession planning is like that.  Do you think it is purely coincidental that the word success is in this critical process?  It is proven that companies that perform strategic succession planning have a higher retention rate and a higher level of corporate performance than those that do not.

The Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University did a study which showed that 50% of companies cannot immediately name a successor to the CEO, let alone below this position.   In a 2010 survey on Succession Planning, only 54% of companies are "actively grooming" a successor and another  39% admitted to having "zero" viable candidates.  Sadly, most boards spend less than 2 hours a year on average planning for succession.  Of the 50% who did have plans in place, only 65% of those have actually asked the identified candidate if the job is wanted.

Succession planning requires preparedness.  What attributes will a successor need to lead the organization through its upcoming challenges?  When successor attributes are defined, maintain evaluations of internal candidates.  Can professional development help fill in gaps of bench executives?

Let's use a classic example.   McDonald's Corporation was about to kick off its 2004 annual meeting when hours prior to the event, CEO Jim Cantalupo, died of heart attack.  Even before the markets opened that day, the board assembled and announced Charlie Bell as successor.  Sadly, Mr. Bell was diagnosed with cancer 9 months later and ultimately resigned.   Jim Skinner was then announced as CEO.  Mr. Skinner guided McDonald's through a downward economy, menu changes, and public criticism for its fried menu.  Then in March of 2012, Don Thompson, another internal candidate groomed for the spot, was named CEO.

You cannot plan for illness, accidents, or the more common resignation by a CEO and/or their direct reports.  Yet well-crafted succession plans save time, money, aggravation while retaining leaders.  An added bonus to succession planning is it builds future leaders, creates discussion for big-picture thinking, and requires individuals to think about today's decisions, their impact and their legacy.

Be prepared!  Always leave your campsite better than you found it!  Maybe today’s corporate boards and leaders would do well by reading the Boy Scout Handbook.

Scott RobinsonWith over 35 years’ experience in the human capital industry, Scott is a trusted adviser to executives in the C-Suite.  After Scott founded, grew, and lead the largest full service human resources firm in the Midwest, Scott chose a transition of his own, and in 2011 he returned to his entrepreneurial roots to launch Robinson Resource Group, a premier boutique Executive Coaching and Search firm. To learn more about Robinson Resource Group, click here.  Along with being a member of the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches (WABC) and receiving their Registered Corporate Coach™ designation, Scott is a member of the Institute of Coaching Professional Association at McLean Hospital—a Harvard Medical School affiliate, the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), The Executives’ Club of Chicago (ECC), Young Presidents Organization (YPO) and is the current Education Chairman of World President’s Organization (WPO).
Scott holds a Bachelor degree in Psychology from Illinois State University and a Master of Science degree in Psychology as well as a Master of Business Administration (MBA) from George Williams College.
If you wish to reproduce this article in any material form, you must first contact WABC for permission.
9Jul/140

Leadership Is A Contact Sport: Listen

Posted by Marshall Goldsmith

When asking for feedback, stop sharing your own opinion and listen.  Treat one's response as a gift!  Marshall Goldsmith discusses the keys to listening in his recent video blog below.

Marshall Goldsmith is a proud member of and partner with the WABC.  In both 2011 and 2013 he was ranked as one of the Top Ten Business Thinkers in the World – and the highest ranking executive coach – at the biennial Thinkers 50 ceremony in London.  He was also the recognized in 2011 as the World’s Most Influential Leadership Thinker.  Dr. Goldsmith is the author or editor of 34 books, including the New York Times bestsellers, MOJO and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There.
If you wish to reproduce this article in any material form, you must first contact WABC for permission.